DOI: https://doi.org/10.22141/1608-1706.1.19.2018.127299

L-arginine accelerates wound healing: new mechanisms and clinical trial data

A.V. Savustianenko

Abstract


In the human body, arginine is extensively metabolized by nitric oxide (NO) synthase to nitrogen monoxide, which has an antimicrobial effect, dilates blood vessels, plays an important role in all phases of wound healing (inflammatory and regenerative). In addition, arginine is metabolized by arginase with the formation of ornithine. Ornithine is converted into polyamines, which are necessary for cell growth, and also becomes a source of proline and hydroxyproline necessary for the synthesis of collagen. Thus, both groups of arginine effects contribute to the recovery of cells and intercellular substance during wound healing. To realize these effects, the ability of this amino acid to increase the content of such growth factors as insulin-like growth factor-I, transforming growth factor-beta, vascular endothelial growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor is important. In addition, arginine shows immunostimulating properties, which is important for fighting infection of the wound. The review details new data on the role of NO in angiogenesis (the formation of vessels from endothelial cells remaining in the wound of the vessels) and vasculogenesis (formation of vessels from endothelial progenitor cells released from the bone marrow) during wound healing. Examples of clinical trials, in which the efficacy of L-arginine has been demonstrated in patients with bedsores and diabetic foot, are given.

Keywords


arginine; nitric oxide; angiogenesis; vasculogenesis; wounds

References


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